2017/01/17

Ancient Egyptian Uraeus

The Uraeus  Uraei or Uraeuses   is the stylized, upright form of an Egyptian cobra (serpent, or snake), used as a symbol of sovereignty, royalty, deity and divine authority in ancient Egypt.

The Uraeus is a symbol for the goddess Wadjet. She was one of the earliest Egyptian deities and who often was depicted as a cobra. The center of her cult was in Per-Wadjet, later called Buto by the Greeks.

She became the patroness of the Nile Delta and the protector of all of Lower Egypt. The pharaohs wore the Uraeus as a head ornament: either with the body of Wadjet atop the head, or as a crown encircling the head; this indicated Wadjet's protection and reinforced the pharaoh's claim over the land.

Uraeus of King Senusert II

In whatever manner that the Uraeus was displayed upon the pharaoh's head, it was, in effect, part of the pharaoh's crown. The pharaoh was recognized only by wearing the Uraeus, which conveyed legitimacy to the ruler. There is evidence for this tradition even in the Old Kingdom during the third millennium BCE.

Several goddesses associated with or being considered aspects of Wadjet are depicted wearing the Uraeus also. At the time of the unification of Egypt, the image of Nekhbet, who was represented as a white vulture and held the same position as the patron of Upper Egypt, joined the image of Wadjet on the Uraeus that would encircle the crown of the pharaohs who ruled the unified Egypt.

 The importance of their separate cults kept them from becoming merged as with so many Egyptian deities. Together, they were known as The Two Ladies, who became the joint protectors and patrons of the unified Egypt.

Later, the pharaohs were seen as a manifestation of the sun god Ra, and so it also was believed that the Uraeus protected them by spitting fire on their enemies from the fiery eye of the goddess. In some mythological works, the eyes of Ra are said to be uraei.

Wadjets existed long before the rise of this cult when they originated as the eye of Wadjet as cobra and are the name of the symbols also called the Eye of the Moon, Eye of Hathor, the Eye of Horus, and the Eye of Ra depending upon the dates of the references to the symbols.

As the Uraeus was seen as a royal symbol, the deities Horus and Set were also depicted wearing the symbol on their crowns. In early ancient Egyptian mythology, Horus would have been the name given to any king as part of the many titles taken, being identified as the son of the goddess.

According to the later mythology of Re, the first Uraeus was said to have been created by the goddess Isis, who formed it from the dust of the earth and the spittle of the then-current sun deity.

 In this version of the mythology, the Uraeus was the instrument with which Isis gained the throne of Egypt for Osiris. Isis is associated with and may be considered an aspect of Wadjet.


2017/01/09

Ancient Egyptian Animals Video


 Perhaps, one of the few ancient communities who regarded animals as sacred was the Egyptian community. It is interesting to study about the animals of Ancient Egypt.

Cats were worshipped by the people. Bastet was the cat goddess. Cat mummies are found out in large numbers. Cats were popular companions of the people.

 A bull represented power, aggression and masculinity. A cow's quiet demeanour suggested a gentle aspect of feminine beauty. Her gift of milk was considered important.



The lion was connected with the rising and the setting of the sun, and so were thought to be guardians of the horizon and were linked to solar deities.

In Ancient Egypt, the fish had both sacred and scorned species. Some were sacred in some places and not allowed to be eaten, whereas in other places, anyone could eat the fish. Some of the fish in Egypt included the carp, perch and catfish.


 


2016/12/19

Ancient Egypt Clothing Video


The ancient Egyptians both men and women wore linen clothes all throughout the hot weather. The men wore short skirts around their waists called kilts, while the women wore straight fitting dresses with straps on their shoulders. 

The wealthy men wore pleated kilts, and the older men wore a longer kilt. When doing hard work, men wore a loin cloth, and women wore a short skirt. Children usually ran around nude during the summer months. Linen is a fabric made from plant fibers.

Now we'll show video about Ancient Egyptians Men and Women Clothes

Ancient Egypt Clothing Video






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2016/11/13

Why did the Ancient Egyptians make mummies?

Why did the Ancient Egyptians make mummies ?

Why was mummification important to the Egyptians ?

Why did the ancient Egyptians mummify people ?


Ancient Egyptian Mummies

Mummies, but not unique to ancient Egypt, were an important part of their culture. Death and the afterlife was an important aspect of their culture.

 The ancient Egyptians had a god devoted to death, Anubis, the god of death, the surgeon and healers. It has been linked to the process of mummification. Previously, he was invoked while the Pharaoh is buried.

The high priest donned the mask of Anubis while leading the mummification. This was done because of their belief that Anubis will direct them correctly during the process.

2016/08/04

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

The shining jewel of Qatar, Doha is a multicultural city, home to most of the country's population as well as expatriate communities from a range of backgrounds. Shopping abounds in plentiful shopping centers of the city, while the Corniche impresses visitors with picturesque architecture and dazzling views of the harbor. 

Doha has countless cultural facilities, including the futuristic Education City and the National Museum.  After hosting the 2006 Asian Games, the city is home to many sports complexes as wellLocated on the southern coast of the Persian Gulf, the capital of Qatar has experienced rapid and impressive growth over the last 50 years.  

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar

Doha, shining jewel of Qatar


 
Today, Doha is firmly established as a major international center for art and culture, with world-class museums, ultra-modern skyscrapers and a walk on the banks of beautiful sea. 

 It is also one of the safest cities in the Middle East and welcomes expatriates from around the world - to the extent that some estimates suggest that the Qataris are now outnumbered by as much as six to one. The warm climate makes the perfect winter escape, with temperatures ranging from 20-30 degrees Celsius between November and April.

2016/07/27

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Occupations of ancient Egyptians depended heavily on their social structure. Many jobs were available to them because they had a well ordered society. Many jobs were inherited in ancient Egypt. But social mobility was not impossible.A look into the social pyramid of Egypt is necessary to understand the jobs people took to: Ultimate power was vested in the Pharaoh, the king of Egypt. Though gods were the controllers of the country, Pharaoh was believed to be god in human form.The Pharaoh's closest advisor, the vizier had the status of a prime minster.

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Government officials such as priests and nobles came next. Soldiers and scribes came thereafter. This was followed by Merchants, Artisans and farmers. Slaves and servants formed the bottom of the social pyramid.Pharaoh was the ultimate authority in the country. He was to manage the army and protect the people. He was in charge of enforcing law and order in the country.The vizier was an important court official. He had to manage building and construction, manage labour, collect taxes, supervise administration, maintain accounts etc. Noblemen helped the Pharaoh run the country these were the people that worked in the government.Scribe was an important occupation in Egypt. Scribes were the few literate people of Egypt.

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs


Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs


Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs

Ancient Egyptian Jobs


They were responsible for jobs relating to teaching. The Priests and Priestesses looked after the temples and conducted the religious ceremonies.Astrologers also had important jobs relating to religious observances and the location and position for temples and tombs.Egypt is famous for their knowledge in architecture to which the great pyramids serve testimony. Therefore, building and construction were also important jobs in the country.

The vast building programs in Ancient Egypt necessitated the jobs of engineers and architects. Forced labour and slave system existed.Though Egypt was a peaceful country, there existed an army. Commands in the army provided the opportunity for ordinary people to rise in society.

The most common jobs were related to the foot soldiers but the charioteers were a respected force.There were craftsmen who were also employed for complicated stone cutting and creating sculptures. Artists were employed to decorate the homes of wealthy Egyptians and to decorate tombs and temples.

There were entertainers who were the dancers and acrobats who entertained wealthy Egyptians.  Dwarfs were a popular form of court entertainment.Farmers also lived a merry life in ancient Egypt as Nile provided an excellent source of irrigation. Merchants bought and sold commodities.

There were also fishermen, manual labourers, weavers, metal workers, potters, carpenters, upholsterers, tailors, shoe-makers, glass-blowers, boat-builders, wig-makers, and embalmers. Story-tellers, cooks, gardeners, masons, miners and butchers also existed.

Ancient Egyptian Food For Kids

It is interesting to study the food habits of ancient Egyptians, among other aspects of their living. It is surprising that, ful medammes,the bean dish which is now the National Dish of Egypt was eaten in the Pharaonic periods. What the ancient Egyptians ate varied depending of their social and financial status. If you are rich, you are made available better food.Egyptian food recipes were influenced by factors like foreign invasion, foreign trade.

Ancient Egyptian Food For Kids

Main influence to Egyptian cuisine came from Syria, Lebanon, Turkey and Greece.Ancient Egyptians mainly grew wheat and barley; they used wheat to bake bread and used barley to make beer. Beer was an ancient national drink in Egypt and it was stored in special beer jars. Spices were added to it for improving the taste. Wine was the drink for the rich and it was made from vineyards. Bread was different from the breads we eat today.The hard and gritty bread was very dangerous to their teeth.

But it was the stable food of many Egyptians. The most common type of bread is a pita type made either with refined white flour called aysh shami, or with coarse, whole wheat, aysh baladi.There were more than thirty different shapes of bread. Honey was used as there was no sugar. Beans was another main crop they grew.Egyptian farming and agriculture flourished because of the Nile river. Vegetables constitute the main ingredient of most Egyptian dishes in additions to meat (beef and chicken). Fruits are eaten as dessert after a meal with many other sweet dishes that Egyptians excel at making.

Ancient Egyptian Food For Kids

Ancient Egyptian Food For Kids

Ancient Egyptian Food For Kids


The fruits the Egyptians ate were dates, grapes, pomegranate, peaches, watermelon etc. although the nature of the fruit varied with the prevailing season and agriculture. Several types of meats were eaten, including pork in some regions. Cattle beef was commonly eaten by the rich, along with sheep or goat, while the poor often ate geese, ducks and other fowl.Even when the other regions were affected by famines, the people of Egypt were secured because the Nile was there to feed the people.

Strong-tasting vegetables like onion were liked by them.They also ate peas and beans, lettuce, cucumbers and leeks. Vegetables were often served with oil and vinegar dressing. Fish and poultry were consumed by the people. Fish and meat were stored by methods like salting.Cooking was done by housewives in ordinary families and servants in richer families. Kitchen tools like mortars were also used.

 Melokhya which is a soup made from a leafy green summer vegetable was a traditional dish in Egypt. Basbousa, a type of sweet, Baklawah, Um Aly, a raisin cake, Konafa, Katayef were the sweet deserts of ancient Egypt.

Ancient Egyptian Sandals

During the ancient Egyptian period people mostly travelled barefoot. It is believed that since the temperature in Egypt was very high throughout the year, people gave less importance to wearing footwear. There is hardly any record to suggest that the Egyptians wore shoes or any other form of footwear. The ancient Egyptians began wearing sandals during the early years of the New Kingdom rule.

Ancient Egyptian Sandals

Ancient Egyptian Sandals

The sandals used by these people were very simple and were made either by using straw, reeds or leather. The wealthy people wore leather sandals and these lasted for a longer time than the sandals which were made using straw or reeds. The sandals were worn by all people belonging to all the classes except those who were extremely poor.

The sandals were decorated by using beads, jewels; some also had buckles on the straps made from precious metals. For the most part, the ancient Egyptians walked without wearing sandals or shoes. Sandals were worn by people on special events. The gold and wood sandals are known to have been made in the ancient Egyptian period.

During the Middle and New Kingdoms time, the sandals were commonly used. The use of covered shoes by the ancient Egyptians is not very well known. However some records suggest that shoes were made by weaving palm fiber and grass.

In the Early Middle Kingdom, shoes were a modification of sandals. Shoes had straps between the toes and were joined to the sides at the heel. It also had leather cover which protected the feet. The Hittites settled in Anatolian highlands wore shoes with turned up toes. The Egyptians during the New Kingdom period are said to be influenced by the Hittites and began using shoes.